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Wydział Chemii

Wiadomości Chemiczne Polskie Towarzystwo Chemiczne MNiSW

Erasmus. Optional courses

07.07.2017
Erasmus, Optional courses

Legend:
L- Lecture, Lab - Laboratories, S - Seminars, T- Tutorials, S-s - Self-study
E- Exam, Cr - Credit

winter semester E/Cr L Lab S T S-s ECTS
Quantitative analytical chemistry (full program) E   60   30 30 10
Quantitative analytical chemistry
(half-semester program)
E   30   15 20 6
Inorganic chemistry Cr   30   15 20 6
Preparative Organic Chemistry Cr   30   15 20 6
Chemistry in action: ideas and applications Cr 30 30   15 20 3

summer semester E/Cr L Lab S T S-s ECTS
Quantitative analytical chemistry
(full program)
E   60   30 30 10
Quantitative analytical chemistry
(half-semester program)
E   30   15 20 6
Applied photochemistry laboratory Cr   30   15 20 6
Green chemistry Cr   30   15 20 5
Inorganic Chemistry Cr   30   15 20 6
Organic Reactions Cr   30   15 20 6
English for Science And Technology E/Cr 15   15     3

Quantitative analytical chemistry (full program)

Prof. dr hab. Jacek Gliński
Laboratory: 60 hours
Tutorials: 30 hours
Self-study: 30 hours
ECTS points: 10
Level of course: fundamental.
Objective of the course:
Knowledge of foundations of analytical chemistry, application of simple calculations on chemical equilibria in laboratory practice, practical knowledge of fundamental analytical reactions and techniques of classical quantitative analysis.
Course contents:
Laboratory:7 simple classical analyses and 4 instrumental analyses. Except NaOH, all other titrants will be prepared by the laboratory staff or by weighing. Titrants: 0.1 M NaOH, 0.1 M Na2S2O3 and 0.02 M KMnO4 prepared using commercial concentrated volumetric solution (Fixanal® or similar).
Classical analyses: (Alkacymetry 1) Determination of the mass of ascorbinic acid (vitamin C) or acetylosalicylic acid in tablets; (Alkacymetry 2) Analysis of H3PO4 (classical with two titration end-points); (Alkacymetry 3) pH-metric titration of H3PO4 pure sample or in Coca-Cola/Pepsi, or citric acid in citron juice; (Gravimetry) Analysis of Ni gravimetrically (with dimethylglyoxime); Redoxometry) Analysis of Cu iodometrically; Analysis of Fe manganometrically; (Precipitation analysis) Analysis of Cl argentometrically (by Mohr method); (Complexometry) Analysis of Ca+Mg complexonometrically (preferably in a carbonate rock).
Instrumental analyses: Turbidimetry (analysis of sulphates or chlorides); Colorimetry (analysis of phosphates or iron); Extraction (analysis of fat content in food); Densimetry (determination of alcohol content in beverages); plus one or two analyses chosen from the following: electrogravimetry, conductometric titration of sulphates, spectrophotometry of natural dyes (this list can be expanded).
Theory:Reactions of proton transfer, acid/base equilibrium, calculating pH of solutions: acids, bases, buffers, ampholites. Titration curve, indicators. Reactions with electron transfer: redox reactions, redox equilibrium. Reactions of transfer of ions and molecules, coordination compounds, complex formation equilibrium. Heterogenic equilibria, processes influencing these equilibria: the “common ion” effect and salt effect. The basis of selected instrumental methods of analysis.
Assessment methods:
Partial tests concerning laboratory works, positive results of the analyses, final exam (oral).
Literature:
1. Douglas A. Skoog, Donald M. West, F. James Holler,Stanley R. Crouch, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, Thomson Brooks/cole (2000).

Quantitative analytical chemistry (half-semester program)

Prof. dr hab. Jacek Gliński
Laboratory: 30 hours
Tutorials:15 hours
Self-study: 20 hours
ECTS points: 6
Level of course: fundamental.
Objective of the course:
Knowledge of foundations of analytical chemistry, application of simple calculations on chemical equilibria in laboratory practice, practical knowledge of fundamental analytical reactions and techniques of classical quantitative analysis.
Course contents:
Laboratory:7 simple analyses. Except NaOH, all other titrants will be prepared by the laboratory staff or by weighing. Titrants: 0.1 M NaOH, 0.1 M Na2S2O3 and 0.02 M KMnO4 prepared using commercial concentrated volumetric solution (Fixanal® or similar).
Analyses: (Alkacymetry) Determination of the mass of ascorbinic acid (vitamin C) or acetylosalicylic acid in tablets; Analysis of H3PO4 (classical with two titration end-points) plus pH-metric titration of H3PO4 pure sample or in Coca-Cola/Pepsi, or citric acid in citron juice; (Gravimetry) Analysis of Ni gravimetrically (with dimethylglyoxime); Redoxometry) Analysis of Cu iodometrically; Analysis of Fe manganometrically; (Precipitation analysis) Analysis of Cl argentometrically (by Mohr method); (Complexometry) Analysis of Ca+Mg complexonometrically (preferably in a carbonate rock). If enough time – also a simple instrumental analysis, for example spectrophotometric.
Theory:Reactions of proton transfer, acid/base equilibrium, calculating pH of solutions: acids, bases, buffers, ampholites. Titration curve, indicators. Reactions with electron transfer: redox reactions, redox equilibrium. Reactions of transfer of ions and molecules, coordination compounds, complex formation equilibrium. Heterogenic equilibria, processes influencing these equilibria: the “common ion” effect and salt effect.
Assessment methods:
Partial tests concerning laboratory works, positive results of the analyses, final exam (oral).
Literature:
1. Douglas A. Skoog, Donald M. West, F. James Holler,Stanley R. Crouch, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, Thomson Brooks/cole (2000).

Inorganic chemistry

Dr Anna Skarżyńska
Laboratory: 30 hours
Tutorials:15 hours
Self-study: 20 hours
ECTS points: 6
Level of course: fundamental.
Objective of the course:
Laboratory: The competence in routine methods of synthesis of inorganic compounds and transition metal complexes.
Course contents:
Laboratory: Preparation of 6 compounds of different type:
1. Halogen compounds Cs[BrICl].
2. Nitrogen compounds K2ON(SO3)2 (Fremy salt).
3. Preparation and properties of S2O82- ion: K2S2O8, [Ag(py)4]2+.
5. Aqua-complexes [Cr(H2O)6]3+, [CrCl(H2O)5]2+, [CrCl2(H2O)4]+.
6. Chelate complexes [VO(acac)2] or [Ni(en)3]2+.
Assessment methods:
Assessment both the individual experimental work and the ability of structural characterization of inorganic compounds.
Literature:
1. Jolly W. L., The Synthesis and Characterization of Inorganic Compounds, Prentice-Hall, Inc., EnglewoodCliffs, NJ, 1970;
2. Angelici R. J., Synthesis and Technique in Inorganic Chemistry, 2-nd edition, University Science Press, Mill Valley, CA, 1986.
3. Woollins J.D. (edit.), Inorganic Experiments, 2-nd edition, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim 2003.

Preparative Organic Chemistry

dr hab. Miłosz Pawlicki
Laboratory 30 hours (5 meetings, 6 hours each)
Tutorials:15 hours
Self-study: 20 hours
ECTS points: 6
Level of course: fundamental.
Objective of the course:
Practical organic synthesis.
Course contents:
The experiments are typical preparations of simple organic compounds with objective to teach basic synthetic and purification techniques. They include performing reflux, distillation, extraction, separation, crystallization and determination of the melting point, the boiling point, the index of refraction.
Laboratory Exercises:
1. Synthesis of acetanilide
2. Synthesis of p-nitroacetanilide
3. Synthesis of 2-iodopropane
4. Synthesis of cyclohexanone
5. Synthesis of cyclohexanone oxime
Assessment methods:
Written reports
Literature:
1. A.I. Vogel, A.R. Tatchell, B.S. Furnis, A.J. Hannaford, P.W.G. Smith, Vogel's textbook of practical organic chemistry, Prentice Hall 1996
2. J. W. Zubrick, The Organic Chem Lab Survival Manual, Wiley 2010

Organic Reactions

dr hab. Miłosz Pawlicki
Laboratory 30 hours (5 meetings, 5 hours each)
Tutorials : 15 hours
Self-study: 20 hours
ECTS points: 6
Level of course: fundamental.
Objective of the course:
General overview of reactivities of organic compounds. Observation and interpretation.
Course contents:
Simple characteristic reactions of the main classes of organic compounds (listed below) will be performed in tubes. Their analytical value will be underlined. Precise observations will be held and interpreted, proper laboratory notes will be carried out.
Laboratory Exercises:
1. Hydrocarbons.
2. Alcohols and phenols.
3. Aldehydes, ketones and sugars.
4. Carboxylic acids, esters and fats.
5. Amines, amides and aminoacids.
Assessment methods:
Each meeting will be closed by a short practical test.
Evaluation by a written report.
Literature:
1. A.I. Vogel, A.R. Tatchell, B.S. Furnis, A.J. Hannaford, P.W.G. Smith, Vogel's textbook of practical organic chemistry, Prentice Hall 1996,
2. J. W. Zubrick, The Organic Chem Lab Survival Manual, Wiley 2010

Chemistry in action: ideas and applications

prof. dr hab. Jerzy Lisowski
Lecture: 30 hours.
ECTS points: 3.0
Level of course: Fundamental.
Objective of the course:
The lecture presents selected modern research trends in chemistry and illustrates the importance of creativity in the development of applications and technology. The lecture may be accompanied by the exercises in English communication – discussion and students own presentation.
Course contents:
The lecture encompasses selected examples related to many areas of chemistry:
  • Smart contrast agents for medical imaging
  • molecular machines,
  • sensors,
  • molecular switches
  • nanotechnology and molecular computers,
  • NO and Viagra story,
  • enantioselective catalysts in pharmaceutical industry,
  • artificial nucleases and antisense technology
  • optical, conducting and magnetic materials
Assessment methods:
Oral exam.

Applied photochemistry laboratory

dr hab. M. Sobczyk
Laboratory: 30 hours
Tutorials:15 hours
Self-study: 20 hours
ECTS points: 6
Level of course: medium-advanced
Objectives of the course:
The aim of the laboratory is to train students’ skills in experimental work using different photochemistry techniques. Students will perform a set of photochemical experiments with different light sources and various detection methods (UV-Vis, fluorescence, IR).
Course content:
Laboratory topics: Thermal and photochemical reactions. Formation and deactivation of the electronic excited states. Types of the photochemical reactions. Fundamental photochemical laws. Light sources in photochemistry. Techniques used in modern applied photochemistry. Actinometry. Excited states quenchers.Photochromism, its examples and applications. Photochromic and mask materials.
Laboratory Exercises:
  1. Photochromism and kinetics of the redox reactions of indoles.
  2. Photoisomerization of trans-resveratrol.
  3. Photophysics and photochemistry of benzophenone in 2-propanol.
  4. Solar irradiation of bilirubin – photochemical oxidation reaction.
  5. Förster cycle – adiabatic proton transfer reaction of 2-naphthol
Assesment methods:
Permanent evaluation of the experimental work and written reports.
Literature
1. P. Klan, J. Wirz, Photochemistry of Organic Compounds, Wiley (2009)
2. G. Stochel, M. Brindell, W. Macyk, Z. Stasicka, K. Szaciłowski, Bioinorganic Photochemistry, Wiley (2009)

Green chemistry

dr Andrzej Gniewek
Laboratory: 30 hours
Tutorials:15 hours
Self-study: 20 hours
ECTS points: 5
Level of course: fundamental.
Objective of the course:
Knowledge of green chemistry rules and their practical application in chemical laboratory and technology.
Course contents:
Laboratory program: Realization of 6 experiments: 1. Ionic liquid – synthesis and extracting properties. 2. Termochromic properties of [Bu4N]2[CuCl4]. 3. Recovery of aluminium from wastes. 4. Reactions of nickel compounds with ionic liquids. 5. Polymerization of methyl acrylate under sonochemical conditions. 6. UV absorption by selected cosmetics.
Assessment methods:
Evaluation of experimental work and written reports.
Literature:
1. A.S. Matlack, Introduction to green chemistry, CRC Press, 2010
2. P. Wasserscheid, T. Welton, Ionic liquids in synthesis, Wiley, 2008
3. P.T. Anastas, J.C. Warner, Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice, OxfordUniversityPress, 1998

English for science and technology

dr Michał J. Kobyłka
Lecture: 15 hours.
Seminarium:: 15 hours.
ECTS points: 3
Level of course: Intermediate to advanced.
Objective of the course:
English for Science and Technology has been designed to meet the specific needs of students in intermediate and advanced courses as well as those who want to specialize or work in any of the fields of science. It covers all the key vocabulary, structure and usage which can be come across in academic textbooks, articles and lectures. The seminar is appropriate for students at intermediate level and above, as well as those preparing for IELTS and other university examinations. It can be very useful for students who want to take part in any of the student exchange programmes (Erasmus, Erasmus Mundus), or after graduating are interested in bilingual teaching.
Course contents:
The seminar is designed for anyone using English for their academic work. It is constructed as a resource for upper-level chemistry majors faced with the need of using the language for reading, writing or presenting various topics related to chemistry. The vocabulary deals with such topics as chemical elements, environmental pollution, sources of energy, laboratory apparatus, laboratory techniques, properties of some chemical compounds as well as vocabulary that targets such important chemistry genres as writing (research report, journal article, conference abstracts or scientific poster) and presenting (oral presentation). Science majors can additionally practice their language skills in the following job-related scenarios:
· Research and Development
· Design and Testing
· Constructions and Manufacturing Production
· Quality control and inspection, Operation and Maintenance
· Management.
New vocabulary will be presented in real-life academic context including extracts from lectures, presentation, essays, tables and graphs.
Assessment methods:
Individual and group projects credited on the basis of written reports or oral presentation.
Literature:
1. M. McCarthy, F. O'Dell, Academic Vocabulary in Use, CambridgeUniversityPress 2008
2. P. Domański, English in Science and Technology, WNT, Warszawa 1996
3. M. Charmas, English for Students of Chemistry, Wydawnictwo UMCS, Lublin 2008
4. I. Williams, English for Science and Engineering, Thomson ELT 2007
5. M. Robinson, F. Stoller, M. Constanza-Robinson, J. K. Jones, Write Like a Chemist, OxfordUniversityPress 2008

Data ostatniej modyfikacji: 07.07.2017 godzina: 12:25:28